Are you coming up to a Home Improvement project soon where you will be replacing your flooring but are weary of choosing tile? Maybe it’s because you have heard some things about it that sound horrifying, you are now against the very idea of even considering it. Maybe you don’t hate tile that much, but today we will go through the 6 most common myths about tile and show you the truth. This way you can make an educated, well thought out decision. Here are the myths, and why they aren’t true. 

 

Myth: Tile is boring

Reality: Nowadays with the multitude of different flooring options available tile seems boring and difficult to customize. Hardwood is available in so many different grains, styles, & colors. Carpet has been expanding to include a wider variety of texture than ever before and vinyl now can be created to mimic any natural material out there. What many don’t realize is that in the last decade imaging technology has greatly improved, now tile can be customized to mimic hardwood, natural stone, or a completely custom pattern. Today you have more opportunity for tile customization than even your choice of hardwood. 

 

Myth: Tile flooring is cold

Reality: This myth is true in some sense but not entirely. It is portrayed much worse than it is in reality. Tile is a conductor of temperature and holds a certain temperature for a very long time (kind of like stone). Taking this into account, during the winter if you live in a cold area tile that is exposed to the cold will retain the temperature and remain cool for long periods of time without warming up. Not always though, there is such a thing as radiant heat mats that can be installed directly underneath the tile. These can be controlled by a thermostat and will often actually help you save money on your heating bill (although they are pricey to install in the beginning). Another factor to pay attention to: the location where the tile is being installed and the material underneath. Above a well insulated area that is not directly perpendicular to the outdoors the tile will not have as a great a source of cold temperature as tile installed directly over concrete. 

 

Myth: Wood look alike tile looks fake

Reality: Maybe at first, but today wood look alike tile often times looks better than the real thing. With advanced imaging technology wood textures are printed directly onto the travertine creating not only a beautiful look but an authentic feel. If you are worried about the grout lines that will give it away, don’t. You can purchase tile that is finely cut to match the surrounding pieces requiring little grout and almost no transition.

 

Myth: Tile flooring is expensive

Reality: Every valuable investment is made with hope that it was worth it. Although tile is significantly more expensive to purchase and install than vinyl or carpet it can last for much longer. The most durable vinyl won’t last longer than 20 years. Carpet, you’ll be lucky if it lasts 10-15 years. Tile on the other hand will last a lifetime, if not longer. There’s a reason it has been the go to flooring material for thousands of years. Spending double what you would spend on carpet or vinyl will pay off in the long run. Even if you aren’t planning on selling your house in the short term: if done right, tile will increase the monetary and visual value of your home. 

 

Myth: Tile breaks easily

Reality: Tile; porcelain, ceramic, & travertine are much more durable than you imagined. Yes it is possible to chip or crack tile, but much less so than majority of other flooring materials. Tile is the only material that water will not damage, as well as the only material that you can be sure will not face scratching or denting from a pets claws. If one tile is damaged it can easily be taken out and replaced by a new one. Vinyl on the other hand requires repairing the whole section. 

 

Myth: Tile requires little or no maintenance or care

Reality: Although tile is plenty more durable than most other flooring materials, it still requires upkeep and maintenance. A properly sealed tile floor requires much less maintenance as it will not be affected as much by daily wear and tear. You must periodically reseal the floor to ensure that it is protected as well as picking up stains and moisture as soon as it happens. Although ceramic and porcelain are considered strong materials the grout in between them will give way to acid and erosion, thus should be avoided. 

 

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We also wanted to introduce you to a Home Improvement magazine we recently started called PDXPRO you can find more information about it as well as subscribe by visiting www.PDXPRO.org